Login
Image



Catch up on news in weather, food, health/fitness, travel, etc.

This Day in History

Cameroon's Lake Monoun Explodes, Suffocating 37 (1984)
The explosion at Cameroon's Lake Monoun, which killed 37 people, at first baffled investigators. It was only after a similar event at nearby Lake Nyos two years later claimed the lives of 1,700 people that experts determined that high concentration of carbon dioxide in the lakes had caused the suffocating limnic eruptions. Venting pipes were inserted into Lake Monoun to remove the gas and prevent future eruptions. How many lakes in the world are susceptible to this sort of deadly gas release? Discuss

Final Public Execution in the US (1936)
In 1936, convicted rapist Rainey Bethea was sentenced to be hanged in Owensboro, Kentucky, at a time when such hangings were conducted publicly. Because the county sheriff supervising the execution was a woman, the case sparked national press coverage, and up to 20,000 spectators gathered to watch the event, the last of its kind in the US. Two years later, the Kentucky legislature officially put an end to public executions. How did newspaper reports depict the hanging?

The Berlin Wall Goes Up (1961)
After World War II, the Soviet Union occupied East Berlin while control of West Berlin was split between the US, the UK, and France. From 1949 to 1961, more than 2 million East Germans fled to West Germany to escape Communist rule before the wall was built to stop the tide of defectors. First constructed of barbed wire and erected at night, the barrier was eventually replaced by a concrete structure studded with watchtowers manned by East German soldiers. What was the "Death Strip"?

Embracing Privacy Best Practices for the Industry
As the market leader in consumer genomics, Ancestry recognizes our responsibility to lead by example and set the bar for industry innovation. We empower our customers at every step of their self-discovery journey, and protecting our customers’ privacy is our highest priority. We understand the sensitive nature of the information we handle and our responsibility Read More

Jean Smart: After the Witch Trials
What do you do when the paper trail for your ancestor ends? Jean Smart discovered the answer was to not give up. Jean went on a road of discovery and found that her 8x great-grandmother, Dorcas Galley, was accused as a witch in Salem, Massachusetts. Shortly after her trial in 1692, Dorcas appeared to vanish Read More

Molly Shannon: Secrets in Irish Marriage Records
Sometimes a simple piece of paper can unlock a deep and tragic story about your ancestors. That’s what happened for Molly Shannon, who went on an emotional journey to trace her 2x great-grandparents, Hugh Cattigan and Bridget Farry. Molly’s adventure led her to Ireland, where she discovered their 1851 marriage certificate. That simple piece of Read More

Ancestry Product Update: Family Group Sheets are Back!
The Family Group Sheet has returned to aid in your research! If you are unfamiliar with a Family Group Sheet (or Family Group Record), it is a view of parents and children in a family, and is designed to show names, dates, and places of birth, marriages, and deaths in an easy-to-read format. It has Read More

Alternative WWI Army Service Detail Sources
Searching for information on Army military service from World War I can be a bit difficult for some researchers due to the 1973 fire at the National Personnel Records Center (NPRC). We tend to think we have to only look for World War I Army service information at the NPRC and if the records burned, Read More

Hilary Duff: Tracing Rags back to Riches
Hilary Duff knew her father was born into money, but her mother grew up poor. She assumed that, because of the poverty, little could be learned about her mother’s side of the family. But once Hilary embarked on the quest to discover her mother’s ancestors, she soon found secret gems buried in her family history. Read More

Megan Mullally: Courageous Women and Their Untold Stories
When Megan Mullally began her journey into the past, she discovered that many records for her family belonged to her male ancestors. She learned the sad truth that most legal documents in the 19th century related to men, with far fewer records belonging to women at the time. Megan realized, like many others researching their Read More

Laverne Cox: Expressions of Freedom
The search for African American ancestors often reveals a tale of hardship and overcoming trials. Laverne Cox went on the hunt to learn more about the family of her 2x great-grandmother, Georgiana Banks, and discovered a trove of stories that showed the African American experience in the 19th century, as well as expressions of freedom Read More

Ancestry Product Update: Conduct Search Utilizing the information on another Member’s Tree
Customers have been able to conduct a search for a person within their own tree utilizing the information in their timeline. Now we have made it possible for customers to conduct a targeted search from a person in a Public Member Tree. Steps: Navigate in the person page of another customer’s tree. To search Read More

It’s the Most Jamboree Time of the Year
One of my favorite conferences of the year is the Southern California Genealogy Jamboree held in June in Burbank each year.  The speakers are stellar.  The exhibit hall is full of learning opportunities.  There are great prizes to won and lots of genealogy networking to be done. In Person If you live anywhere near Burbank, Read More

Why you should visit Fargo
A Scandinavian sense ties together a community and a city with a lot more to see than snow — and that woodchipper.

Were the American cyclists killed in Tajikistan naive for traveling there?
After a deadly attack on Western tourists, experts weigh in on the country’s terrorism threat.

Los Angeles is first in US to install subway body scanners
Los Angeles’ subway will become the first mass transit system in the U.S. to install body scanners that screen passengers for weapons and explosives, officials said Tuesday.

LA to become first in US to install subway body scanners
The Los Angeles subway system will become the first in the U.S. to install body scanners that screen passengers for weapons and explosives, officials said Tuesday.

Find your next vacation with our travel destination generator

Why you should visit Milwaukee
Wisconsin’s largest city welcomes visitors with lake views, stellar food, never-ending brews and a hearty dose of Midwestern niceness.

What is green travel, anyway? A beginners guide to eco-friendly vacation planning.
Experts offer tips on choosing earth-friendly modes of transportation, hotels and activities.

Cooperstown stirs emotions for dad of young baseball player
Two places have triggered tears of joy in my life: The Vatican and Cooperstown.

Put down that lamp! What you can — and can’t — take from your hotel room.
When it comes to hotels, travelers have a range of opinions on what constitutes stealing.

S’more, s’il vous plait? A French company opens its first ‘glampground’ in the U.S.
In New Hampshire’s White Mountains, Huttopia brings its European take on upscale camping to the states.

Mexico: Lopez Obrador expands plan for Yucatan tourist train
Mexico’s president-elect announced an even more ambitious proposal for a train on the Yucatan peninsula Monday that would link nearly all the region’s main tourist draws and cost double or more than the previously announced figure.

Mexico: Lopez Obrador expands plan for Yucatan tourist train
Mexico’s president-elect announced an even more ambitious proposal for a train on the Yucatan peninsula Monday that would link nearly all the region’s main tourist draws and cost double or more than the previously announced figure.

Where to eat breakfast, lunch and dinner in Nashville
In Music City, a medley of flavorful dining options.

TSA tests scanners that allow travelers to keep electronics and liquids in their bags when going through airport security
Fifteen airports, including two in the Washington area, receive the new 3-D technology.

Albania hit by magnitudes 5.4 and 5.1 tremors; homes crack
Northern Albania was struck Saturday by two earthquakes with preliminary magnitudes of 5.4 and 5.1, damaging scores of buildings, authorities said.

Trekking through fire and ice on Greenland’s 102-mile Arctic Circle Trail
From sunburn to Gore-Tex on a nine-day wilderness hike across one of the island’s largest expanses of ice-free terrain.

New U.S. Civil Rights Trail leads to a little-known Virginia museum
The walkout at Robert Russa Moton High School in Farmville marked the start of the battle for equal education.

Trying on a farmhouse in Northern Italy for size
A house swap provides a personal look at life in Italy’s verdant Piemonte region.

Want to stay healthy while flying? Follow this advice from an aviation doctor.
Choose a window seat, wipe down the surfaces and other tips for the wary traveler.

Hurricane Hector to skirt south of Hawaii as it weakens
Hurricane Hector has weakened to a category 3 storm with maximum sustained winds of 125 mph (195 kph) as it passes south of Hawaii’s Big Island.

Don’t make these car-rental mistakes on your next vacation
Overpaying for insurance, failing to document preexisting damage and other things to avoid when renting a vehicle.

Where to eat breakfast, lunch and dinner in the Hamptons
Summering and simmering in the beach villages of New York’s Long Island.

Travel deals: Free hotel night in Mexico’s Cabo San Lucas and $402 fare to Dublin
The week’s best bargains around the globe

Suspect in California subway double stabbing arrested
A homeless man suspected in a double stabbing that briefly shut down a San Francisco Bay Area subway station last week was arrested Tuesday, authorities said.

Is the era of the white male food critic coming to an end?
As California newspapers fill openings, some argue for people of color, more attention to immigrant cuisines – and perhaps a new definition of the job.

Is the era of the white male food critic coming to an end?
As California newspapers fill openings, some argue for people of color, more attention to immigrant cuisines – and perhaps a new definition of the job.

Video: Coconut Turmeric Sweet Bread
This is not your average sweet bread. Flavored with turmeric and coconut, it tastes like a tropical paradise.

Coconut turmeric cake looks like a sunset and tastes like tropical paradise
And it's vegan, too.

The 2018 Spring Dining Guide
With so many new restaurants in D.C., who can keep up? Tom Sietsema reviews 30 places that opened in the last year, including his top 10.

Free Range on Food: Wednesday, Aug. 15, at noon
We'll be talking about slow cooking for summer, the Georgian version of ratatouille, this week's recipes and more.

Visual recipe: Coconut Turmeric Sweet Bread
This is not your average sweet bread. Flavored with turmeric and coconut, it tastes like a tropical paradise.

Almond Jelly is a surprising summer dessert that's cooler than Jell-O
Chef and cookbook author Virginia Willis makes a perfect cool and refreshing summer dessert: almond jelly with blueberry-ginger compote. The recipe is a nod to Chinese immigrants who settled in the Mississippi Delta.

These comforting lemon basil noodles are a one-pan wonder
It's a meatless bowl full of comfort.

For these wounded warriors, a chef-cooked meal is part of the healing process
At the Warrior Retreat at Bull Run, soldiers and their families get a taste of the VIP treatment.

Public canneries help food lovers save the season. So why are they disappearing?
They took off along with victory gardens but dwindled as interest in convenience food grew.

Lighten up your steak dinner for summer
Seasoning tips and more for this ideal summer meal.

A vibrant summer noodle dish that doesn’t require boiling water
WEEKNIGHT VEGETARIAN | Dried rice vermicelli noodles need only a quick soak before you cook them in a savory sauce.

Add flavor and save money by infusing your own vinegar, booze and more
And it's as easy as combining things in a jar.

Mary Beth Albright's Food Hacks: Steak Hacks
Make the perfect steak with our hacks - including one to lighten up this ideal summer meal.

Quick and simple recipes for sweet summer corn
Because we could eat fresh corn for every meal — including dessert.

5 snacks to fuel your relaxing afternoon at the pool
Channel the snack bar, but make your own sweets and savories for a major upgrade.

These 3 white wines are perfect for summer seafood at $13 or under
RECOMMENDED | Also, two Bolivian reds show how vibrant the country’s viticulture has become.

If you haven’t tasted Bolivian wines, you’re in for some delicious surprises
The nation’s wineries make polished, complex wines — almost all at high altitudes.

These are the 5 recipes our readers loved most this week
Stay cool out there with these summery recipes.

These easy summer flatbreads can be made in no time — and with no oven
Yeast-free naan, English muffins, Georgian shoti and soft beer flatbread go beautifully with the flavors of the season.

How to make better bloody marys at home
Tips for seasoning your own mix and playing around with different kinds of alcohol.

Seafood with a need for speed inside Union Station
FIRST BITE | In cod we trust at the new Legal Sea Bar.